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industry, innovation. so i think we are seeing, in -- for example, education, dramatic change taking place in terms of charter schools, in terms of focusing on stem -- science technology, engineering and math. things that will transform american education, which will transform the american economy. >> that's a good point. and right now, across the country, you're seeing certain areas become rewired for what you're talking about, technology and science. gentlemen, thank you very much. >> thank you. >> great to have you on the program. charles bronfman and jeffrey solomon. >>> up next on "the wall street journal report", what will have an impact on your money. and what a tree and ice have in common. stay with us. tburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day after day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] one pill each morning. 24 hours. zero heartburn. >>> we have some big news to tell you about. beginning in january, we will have a new name. look for "on the money"
? that's ahead. >>> plus, forget about a college education. why the oil fields of america are now attracting the young. [ male announcer ] you are a business pro. executor of efficiency. you can spot an amateur from a mile away... while going shoeless and metal-free in seconds. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle...and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price. now this...will work. [ male announcer ] just like you, business pro. just like you. go national. go like a pro. >>> gold prices closing right now. let's get to bertha coombs. >> gold closing fractionally higher, on track for its twelfth yearly gain, smallest since 2008 because it's been a very tough quarter for gold. despite the fact we've had all these worries, whether it be the fiscal cliff, the election, the situation in europe. nonetheless, gold has just not been the safe haven. this morning, it was industrial metals that got a boost as we saw rallies in asia on hopes that maybe this new regime in china is going to be spending more
to educate you if i didn't just think it was not just theoretically possible but actually feasible for the vast majority of people to succeed at managing their own money. so if that's the case, then why is investing so darn difficult? how many people struggle to make money in the stock market in how the heck can i believe it possible for you to beat the average, the big benchmarks when so many fund managers fail to do so? simple. you can do it but you have to do it the right way. one of the biggest obstacles to successful investing is a lack of clarity about just what investing is supposed to mean. i have seen countless people try to follow the conventional wisdom about money management, only to have their investments wiped out because the conventional wisdom is wrong. and the worst part is those people had no idea they were making a mistake. they actually thought they were being responsible. in other words, to borrow a phrase from "cool hand luke" -- >> what we've got here is failure to communicate. >> and i'm saying it boss. that's why tonight i want to demystify the concept of l
, education and state and local aid. obviously states like hawaii, places like virginia that are more dependent on federal spending would get hit harder than other states, sue. so write down the numbers. write down the percentages and see how much any view they come up with brings it down to figure out what the macro economic effects will be and micro economic effects. simon? >> all right, steve. will do. we are still awaiting president obama to see how things are taking shape on parts of the deal for washington. back in two minutes. sfls welcome back to prounch. in just a few moments the president will take to the foed poed yum there to talk about the fiscal cliff negotiations. john, you have outlined what we believe are some of the components of this possible deal. given what you know, which side gave more at this point? >> i think everybody is giving. look, the president wanted, and democrats wanted, having campaigned on it, $250,000 threshold for family income for the return to the clinton jer gentleman tafrm rates of 39.6. republicans didn't want tax increases on anybody. democra
for education and food stamps and nutrition programs and medicaid. that is something that's great concern to democrats. >> what are they giving up on spending? >> what are we giving up on spending? well, actually, there's a $1.2 trillion on the table right now under our democrats who say let it go. let the across the board cuts take place. because at least in that case, defense bears a part of the burden. and under the sequester, medicaid and some other things are protected. so there's still a $1.047 trillion in spending cuts in the sequester that there are a lot of democrats who are willing to let happen. >> unfortunately we have to leave it there for the moment. lots of things, of course, happening in this hour. but we really do appreciate you joining us today. >> my pleasure. happy new year. you too. >>> howard dean has been on our show many times and he says he wants to go over the fiscal cliff. the former dnc is here and he's going to join us next and tell us what he sees in the situation as it stands. and having an invt like northern trust by your side makes all the difference. we a
to educate the country on the wholistic approach you're talking about. he has to get out of the white house more. he should take a train and go around the country and talk to people about all of these issues so you can mobilize public sentiment. as lincoln said, without it nothing can happen. and that's the goal of the second term. >> i think the gun question, though, is almost less they question of presidential leadership and cultural leadership from people like tom and like me. we are the only two gun owners here. but if you're a moderate, if you're a quail hunter or dove hunter, you have to get into this and say, look, assault weapons are not what this is about. as president clinton said, he had never known anyone that needed an assault weapon to kill a deer. and this is a case where if people, if this is not an organic movement from the country, it's not going to work. it can't come from top down. >> i want to inject the larger political point. we have midterm elections coming up in two years. there's the trench warfare on the budget and entitlements which could take a long time, and gu
or are thinking of buying. at the bottom of this show is about educating you, giving you the ultimate insider's perspective on how the market works and how you can make money. i'm not here just to dole out stock picks. what i really like to do is empower you. that starts with me picking out great stocks and trade them like a pro. over 30 years of investing allowed me to generate a fund. these skills are what refresh this show and guide me as i manage my only charitable trust which you can always follow along at actionalerts.com. one of the easiest ways to identify cramerica names is by watching the stocks that appear on the new high list. stocks from that illustrious list, the highest of the high, have to have something going for them, right? as only the best of the best get new highs and the market is falling apart. what does it tell you? either that it's part of the again yun market or the company itself has serious momentum. no matter how they get there, many stocks from the high list often keep going higher. we saw this success of investing in the new high list over and over again. follow
educating you, giving you the ultimate insider's perspective, i'm not here to just dole out stock picks about the perverbal fish that you buy a man at whole foods. i'll show ewe the tricks that i use to pick out great stocks, and trade them like a pro. methods that allowed me to generate a 24% return after fees at my old hedge fund. these skills are what refresh this show and guide me as i manage my own chartable trust. i tell you everything before i ever pull the tricker. now let's get rolling. one of the easiest ways is stocks that could, but won't necessarily, end up on the show is by watching the stocks that appear on the new high list. stocks from that list, the highest of the high, obviously have something going for them, right? that's especially true in the market. if only the best of the best can hit new highs when the market is falling apart. what's it tell you when they're on the new high list, or the company itself has some serious momentum. no matter how they get there, many stocks on the new high list often just keep going higher. a great bull market like the one we had at
'm a financial adviser and longtime viewer who appreciates what you do to educate and motivate investors. >> thank you. >> caller: i'm wondering if you would share your objective criteria are for investors to use in determining best of breed. thank you. >> well, i've got to tell you, best of breed, start with record dividends and then i go to how a company has done and consistently in good and bad times, and, yes, for best of breed i actually look at the product itself. is the product something i want to use, a bank i want to go to? is it, to use the danny meyer phrase, a great restauranteur, is it the one that's most hospitable to shareholders? anyway, new diversification. it's important. it's what we're preaching tonight. make sure your portfolio is home to some gold, a high yielder, okay. you need a growth stock. you know what, a spec, and then you need geographically safe area for one of them. i'll teach you how to pick the best ones. i want you to be comfortable with your own portfolio. "mad money" will be right back. >> don't miss a second "mad money." follow @jimcramer on twitter.
were the for-profit education companies included apollo which operates the yurvet of phoenix. right now the dow's up 138 points. back to you. >> thank you very much for that. so with less than 20 minutes to go in the last trading session of 1202012, what do you need to know about 2013? >> he says there's some key factors that will offset any risk from the fiscal cliff. chris constantine sees more opportunity in the international market compared to the united states markets heading into the new year. they both join ugh us to break it down for us. john, we're all marveling in washington right now. >> the best deal would be if they got a deal that did something to correct the structural problems. but i think not going over the cliff is probably not good. it wouldn't have been that bad anyways. it would have gone back a day or two into the new year. >> what do you make of the market the fact it's up 140 points now and we don't have a deal yet? >> i think it's because the cliff talk was a bit like a magician's left hand. when he's doing the trick, he's distracting you with the left hand. i t
-time care. pokes in this country are committed to education and educating their children. the last thing they want to go is child care. but they're going to more part-time care. that creates a different view to our franchise owners and how they hire people and hours that they can provide to staff that they're limiting. >> greg, am i wrong in saying that i would assume if you're in the bookkeeping business, this on a short-term basis has to be a good thing? >> it actually is a great thing. yeah, we hit the market in two different areas. one, we obviously offer an opportunity for a group or individual to get into the business and start a career or wealth builder. but obviously, we have a touch with the end users, the 30 plus million around the u.s. and soon to be canada, as well. and supplying that small business owner with not only a bookkeeping service, but also data and analytics to help them run the business and make some business decisions as they grow. >> now, you're a franchise model. if, for example, whether it's dividends or capital gains and that goes up, does that change the gam
of the educational testing service, which administers the test for the college board and is responsible for s.a.t. test security. >> this is not a common occurrence. >> how many impersonations did e.t.s. discover last year? >> about 150. >> but in reality, that's the 150 you know about. that doesn't mean there were only 150 impersonations. >> absolutely. >> landgraf says, according to their data, of the three million students who take the s.a.t. every year, more than 99% do so honestly. his organization spends $11 million on s.a.t. test security annually. do you know how many times sam eshaghoff took the s.a.t.? >> actually, i don't. >> 16 times. does that surprise you? >> no. >> does it concern you about the integrity of your test? if one teenage kid can do that 16 times, and that's all that we know about from him alone? >> yeah, so the integrity of the test, the validity of the test score, is the primary concern of e.t.s. and the college board. since i believe that almost all the students take the test honestly, with integrity, and the score is valid, it's very important that we not overrea
, things like healthcare and education are virtually free. but if you think the french have unlocked the door to paradise, don't start packing yet. [sewing machines whirring] the 35-hour work week, meant to create new jobs, hardly made a dent in unemployment, which still stands at over 10%. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. corrine maier, a part-time employee for the state-owned electricity company, has written a book arguing that the french should work less or at least less well. >> the aim is to keep your job without working, or to do... [laughs] it's not to go higher. >> maier's best seller, bonjour, laziness, reveals her secrets on the art of pretending to work. let me read you the subtitle of your book. "the art and necessity of doing the least possible in a corporation." what is the art? >> because you have to be an actor. >> so you're performing? >> yes, you're performing. >> did you have any idea when you wrote this book that it was going to be so popular with french people? >> uh, no. [laughing] no. >> were you completely shocked? >> uh, yes, i'm very
of that is also to educate other ceos about the importance of aviation. you talk about the tax environment. 20% of the price of your ticket is taxation. you talk about, again the regulatory environment. thees a ease of regulation in a deregulated environment. global competitiveness. you talk about the pricing of oil. this is why we're down in washington, really trying to educate and ceos elected are important in this industry. >> you have players trying to take market share. are you seeing impact of private jet companies sprouting up all over the place, trying to get folks to do private jets? >> really not yet. >> not yet. >> what i hear, is it the corporate jet is not available, i'm flying jetblue. i love that compliment. someone flying from teterboro to west palm beach, they are taking care of that corporation. >> good strategy in teterboro, i'll tell that you. >> it works for us. >> thanks so much pch wonderful to see you and merry christmas. happy holidays. you've heard concerns, tax implications, even recession fears if we go over the fiscal cliff. what happen fess we don't in steve liesm
with skills, a good level of education. we can take advantage of that, even compared with our peers so let's do everything we can to -- the benefit of these positive advantages and not be -- not present people to invest in france because they might be afraid of a lack of visibility on the taxpayers or too high taxes. >> but do you think it's sending the right signal to investors when it's threatening to nationalize a factory? >> no, certainly not. these are not the right ones and clearly what an investor needs is, again, confident. immediately going forward, illustrate will not suffer from taxes or a potential threat. the message should be positive for investors, not just french one, but also we have a strategy to reduce stability. >> but do you understand some people could be forced to leave the country because of increasing back pressure? >> there is a lot of debate around that. my view is that is not the right thing to think that you can put people, like, in jail. it is important to be competitive by providing a favorable environment, something where people will want to stay, invest, cr
. and they're not addressing the real problems of america, which are jobs, productivity, education, science research, and withering infrastructure. this is appalling, and the american people should watch whatever's happening with a sense of disgust. >> you feel clearly very strongly. >> yes. >> why do you think we've got to this stage? what could turn it into a more positive narrative? >> i think we are at this place because the role of muddle in politics has overwhelmed, the lobbying process has overwhelmed the sound financial planning for the american people. we have a mess in the health care spending in the out years, which is real. but the costs of providing medical care through pharmaceutical monopolies, insurance monopolies and hospitalization monopolies means american people pays more than double what the rest of the people pay in the world. we're not fixing that. >> diana, is that your assessment of what we witnessed today? >> we are not making real attempts to cut spending, which is the problem. we have $16 trillion in debt. $1 trillion deficit. and what we're talking about today i
in 2 1/2 years. and barnes & noble chairs rallying over british publishing and education company pearson says it will invest $85.9 million in nook media in exchange for a 5% equity stake. >>> well, houston's port is a big employer and a very busy one, one of the busiest in the world, but it could be stalled by a labor strike that threatens the city, as well as more than a dozen others along the eastern seaboard and gulf coast. annise parker is the mayor of houston. mayor parker, great to have you with us. >> glad to be with you. >> your port handles about 70% of the shipping container business along the gulf coast, so this could be a major blow how will it impact your city, exactly? >> of our nine terminals, two are container terminals, and it will shut those down. 70 to 150 workers will be not showing up to work, will shut down access to those terminals now. we will continue to do business through our other terminals, but it could have a really severe and immediate impact on not just what happens at the port, but this is about cargo moving to other places. so it's everything up
on friday at 5:30 p.m. eastern. if you want more education about currencies, go to currency class at money in motion.cnbc.com. >> an article in today's "new york times" finds once traditional dating priorities like having a good job, physical chemistry, may not matter if your credit score is less than attractive. the "times" interviewed more than 50 daters all around the u.s. they were all under 40 years old. brings us to this morning's squawk on the tweet. what's the most important financial question to ask on a first date. tweet us @squawk street. are we getting any responses? >> i don't know. can you imagine opening up that conversation? so, what's your credit score? are you using experian or transunion? >> i would expect you to do that on a date. >> what? why would you select me? i feel like that's not a compliment. >> this is a question you ask when you're over 40. the responders in that were all under 40. >> that's true. more to do with maybe a nest egg, so to speak, right? >> you can be more reckless. >> oh, yeah. >> london, here we come. >> retailers feeling the effect of slow holi
's education. that group peaked in 2000 in terms of americans, fell since then, turns in 2013, starts to grow and it will be bigger than the baby boom is over the next decade. >> the good times are coming, tobias? >> we think so. >> the baby boomers taking their money out. >> consumer finance, happy you brought that up, almost like you logged it in for me. survey financials shows people post-65 take their equities down. the good news is the baby boom average age is 55. so we've got ten years to worry about that. >> we do our work. >> tobias, good to see you. happy holidays. >> happy holidays to you. your little hockey player? >> the day before christmas, of course, still no fiscal cliff resolution. the $500 billion in spending cuts and tax increases start on january 1st unless the white house and congress reach some sort of agreement. we're joined by former pennsylvania governor ed rendell, co-chair of the campaign to fix the debt. and a cnbc contributor. governor, happy holidays. good morning to you. >> good morning, guys. >> so we're sitting here wondering what can be done in the next seven
, and research laboratories, educational situations, they're looking all over the country at what a sort of mindless 10% cut means or whatever. so they are really at the point of wanting some spes if ity and having someone look at, should we do this program or that program? and that's really what the congressman's going to have to do. >> yeah. i just -- i wonder how that shifts things now? because the narrative right now, and maybe the public will buy it right now, is that the republicans have been obstructionist about the tax issue. once we get past january 1st and you get everything you want, you won't even have to argue about $400,000, $500,000, $1 million. i don't know really if the president has had any reason to negotiate in good faith. >> he knew we were going over -- he knew he could get back to 39.6, and you saw geithner. in fact, congressman, i think we should have learned from this. check out this quick sound bite. >> is the administration prepared to go over the fiscal cliff? >> oh, absolutely. again, there's no prospect to an agreement that doesn't involve those rates going
Search Results 0 to 22 of about 23 (some duplicates have been removed)

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